An Homage to Jessica Alba’s Superhot Bikini Body

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An Homage to Jessica Alba’s Superhot Bikini Body
The Changing winds of Hastinapur

Source: Mahabharata is an epic that has been told, retold and re written many times. Every Indian and a lot of non Indians are very familiar with this story of good versus evil, and doing good at all costs, even if it means to kill your own family in a battle that will decide the fate of the world. An Indian would have been confronted with this epic all his life, in the form of stories, lessons, sermons, moral lessons and what not. So, what makes this book different from the rest, is its fresh perspective.

book

Paperback, 320 pages

Published September 15th 2013 by HarperCollins India

ISBN13: 9789351160878

Edition Language: English

PLOT:  The plot of the Mahabharata is definitely not new: two brothers fighting for what they think is their rightful place on the throne, each wanting to be king, one because it is his dharma(duty) to do so, whereas the other for power and by using whatever means possible. This story and its right and wrong have been debated many many times. So what is new about this book or different about the plot? It is the story of how it all began. Why Ganga had to kill her sons? Why Satyavati made Devavrata take that oath? Did she regret it? Well you find probable answers here.   CHARACTERS: The characters of the Mahabharata are not new, but the books shows and tells us the stories of the characters that were responsible for the Mahabharata, before it could actually reach the time of Yudishtira and Dhuryodhana. It talks about the women such as Ganga, who was chosen to carry out a task that sets it all into motion. Her willingness to do what is expected of her initially, her regret, her attempt to rebel, her resignation to fate, all so clearly etched out. And Satyavati, her independence, her choices that affect the history of an entire nation, and her realization that she had an option, and had she chosen differently, there might have been a better outcome.   WHAT I LIKED: The best part about this retelling is that the characters are portrayed as almost Human and not the faultless demi Gods. The people on Meru and those on earth are real, with real emotions, faults and strengths. The women have real feelings and are not shown as some kind of perfect dolls, who can do no wrong. I especially liked the way the author throws the theory of immaculate conception out the window, puts forth the view that it is not wrong for women to have desires, needs and a say in politics or important decisions. That, done using the Mahabharata as a backdrop, is really commendable.   WHAT I DID NOT LIKE: I actually liked the book. The narration is so smooth, that when it changes from first person to third person and back, you don't realise that it has happened.   RATING:  4/5. The story is not new, but the perspective is. Don't pick up this book if you are one of those fanatics who believe in the sanctity of the epic. This is one book that will make you question the beliefs that have long been held right. Waiting for the next installment of the book.   The book is my personal copy. My opinions are honest and unbiased. Text: Jaibala Rao
An Homage to Jessica Alba’s Superhot Bikini Body
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An Homage to Jessica Alba’s Superhot Bikini Body
boyhood

An Homage to Jessica Alba’s Superhot Bikini Body
Boyhood Review: Twelve Years Of A Life Unfolding Before Your Eyes

Source:   UK Release Date: 11th July Runtime: 166 minutes Ratings: 15 Genre: Drama Director: Richard Linklater Starring: Ellar Coltrane, Patricia Arquette, Ethan Hawke, Lorelei Linklater It was just a normal Wednesday afternoon, when I was typing up a new Facebook status: ‘about to see boyhood.’ Now I know that sounds really strange, so luckily, before I hit the ‘post’ button, I changed it to ‘about to see the film boyhood.’ Ironically, I happened to be amidst an audience of… boys?! A soft smile had eventually made its way across my face, neither did it leave when I had left the cinema, and no, it wasn’t because I didn’t end up being the only female watching this film after all. Richard Linklater’s Boyhood is definitely worth being called an achievement of a lifetime. You are probably wondering why a film about boyhood is so fascinating to watch. The story of a young boy going through different walks of life may sound just like any other drama to you. Frankly speaking, the film isn’t like other films most of us have seen, as it has, in courtesy of its tagline, spent “12 years in the making.” That’s right: a film about an ordinary boy has spent twelve years to make, but why? In the beginning, we see a young boy, Mason, help his mum paint the bedroom he shares with his sister, before they leave. He paints over numbers scribbled on the doorframe. We realise that these numbers are no longer of use, as the film itself becomes a measuring tape. In 2002 Linklater had cast six year old Ellar Coltrane as Mason. In the span of 12 years, the director began to film the same boy, giving us the opportunity to watch him grow and enter manhood. The filming of Boyhood was completed in 2013. What was so fascinating about this film is, not only did we watch the boy change, we watched the surroundings change and the history change. We watched the old computer monitors we used to use when we were 8-11 years old, change into Apple Macs as we turned into the Apple generation. We watched the old phones we used to use, before smartphones came along and turned into iPhones. We saw him and his sister put up vote for Obama signs in people’s front gardens. Most importantly, we watched Mason grow up to be a fine young man. We watched him, as he tried to figure out who he was, what he wanted to do, we watched him have girlfriends, we watched him have his heart broken, and we watched him like proud parents/older siblings, as he smiled for pictures in his graduation hat and gown. We went on a roller coaster ride of emotions with him. Not only did the same person play Mason, but also his parents, played by Patricia Arquette and Ethan Hawke, and his sister, Lorelei Linklater who we also got to see mature. With the sequence beautifully woven together, Linklater’s use of the same characters made the film appear to be so much more natural and seamless. The director definitely takes our journey with a fictional character to a whole new level, giving us the chance to really go on a journey with Mason and see him as he go through the different walks of life. boyhood Words: Ramana Ganger, Picture source: uk.movies.yahoo.com  
An Homage to Jessica Alba’s Superhot Bikini Body
Boyhood Review: Twelve Years Of A Life Unfolding Before Your Eyes

Source: UK Release Date: 11th July Runtime: 166 minutes Ratings: 15 Genre: Drama Director: Richard Linklater Starring: Ellar Coltrane, Patricia Arquette, Ethan Hawke, Lorelei Linklater It was just a normal Wednesday afternoon, when I was typing up a new Facebook status: ‘about to see boyhood.’ Now I know that sounds really strange, so luckily, before I hit the ‘post’ button, I changed it to ‘about to see the film boyhood.’ Ironically, I happened to be amidst an audience of… boys?! A soft smile had eventually made its way across my face, neither did it leave when I had left the cinema, and no, it wasn’t because I didn’t end up being the only female watching this film after all. Richard Linklater’s Boyhood is definitely worth being called an achievement of a lifetime. You are probably wondering why a film about boyhood is so fascinating to watch. The story of a young boy going through different walks of life may sound just like any other drama to you. Frankly speaking, the film isn’t like other films most of us have seen, as it has, in courtesy of its tagline, spent “12 years in the making.” That’s right: a film about an ordinary boy has spent twelve years to make, but why? In the beginning, we see a young boy, Mason, help his mum paint the bedroom he shares with his sister, before they leave. He paints over numbers scribbled on the doorframe. We realise that these numbers are no longer of use, as the film itself becomes a measuring tape. In 2002 Linklater had cast six year old Ellar Coltrane as Mason. In the span of 12 years, the director began to film the same boy, giving us the opportunity to watch him grow and enter manhood. The filming of Boyhood was completed in 2013. What was so fascinating about this film is, not only did we watch the boy change, we watched the surroundings change and the history change. We watched the old computer monitors we used to use when we were 8-11 years old, change into Apple Macs as we turned into the Apple generation. We watched the old phones we used to use, before smartphones came along and turned into iPhones. We saw him and his sister put up vote for Obama signs in people’s front gardens. Most importantly, we watched Mason grow up to be a fine young man. We watched him, as he tried to figure out who he was, what he wanted to do, we watched him have girlfriends, we watched him have his heart broken, and we watched him like proud parents/older siblings, as he smiled for pictures in his graduation hat and gown. We went on a roller coaster ride of emotions with him. Not only did the same person play Mason, but also his parents, played by Patricia Arquette and Ethan Hawke, and his sister, Lorelei Linklater who we also got to see mature. With the sequence beautifully woven together, Linklater’s use of the same characters made the film appear to be so much more natural and seamless. The director definitely takes our journey with a fictional character to a whole new level, giving us the chance to really go on a journey with Mason and see him as he go through the different walks of life. boyhood Text: Ramana Ganger, Picture source: uk.movies.yahoo.com  

Jessica Alba turns 34 on Tuesday, and we’re celebrating with a look back at her best bikini pictures. Jessica’s been no stranger to the two-piece and looks equally as fantastic in a swimsuit on screen as she does while lounging on the beach.

Wear it dry, and you’ve got your standard dusting of color—classic and predictable (in a good way). But wet! Wearing it wet opens a whole new world of opportunity. “What you’re doing is bringing out the pigmented nature of the shadow,” makeup artist Vincent Oquendo says. “Whenever I wet an eye shadow, it’s when I really want it to pop—but it really has to be a special kind of product to be able to blend after it sets. Because a lot of the times when it sets, you get streaking.” Nobody wants that. In order to avoid any wet shadow mishaps, follow these guidelines:

Product

Source: FameFlynet
Source: FameFlynet

First, go with the obvious: any eye shadow labeled wet-to-dry. The Nars Dual-Intensity line is the standout—the singles come in 12 different shimmery shades, and there’s a corresponding brush (then there’s the newly released Dual Intensity Blush line, which was all over Fashion Week—but that’s a product for another post). Burberry also makes a few very versatile shades specifically for this in their Wet & Dry Silk Shadows. And the technique-specific eye shadow category isn’t just a ploy to get you to buy more product. “You can’t just use any eye shadow for this,” Vincent says. “Certain ones will harden up on top and become unusable because they’re not made for this.”

Baked shadows are also fair game—we’re fans of Laura Mercier’s Baked Eye Colour Wet/Dry and Lorac’s Starry-Eyed Baked Eye Shadow Trio in particular.

For more advanced players, Vincent suggests moving on to straight pigment (MAC or even OCC’s Pure Cosmetic Pigments). With the added moisture, they’ll become easier to layer with other products. For a look with more depth, try using a cream shadow as a based before swiping with a wet powder shadow. “It’s like insurance,” Vincent says. “You’re doubling your wearability.

Brush
This all depends on exactly what you want to do. “Mind the resistance,” Vincent says, particularly if you’re looking for uniform color across the lid. “I tend to recommend a blender brush, which is the brush that looks like a feather duster. If you do it with a stiff brush, you’re defeating yourself before you even start. The joy of a wet-to-dry is you have to get it right amount of product loaded up, and then it blends itself. If the brush is too stiff, it will leave the shadow streaky and then much harder to control.”

However, if tightlining or waterlining is in the cards, a much thinner brush is required accordingly.

Liquid
Do not, repeat, do not put eye drops, water, or any other sort of liquid directly on your eye shadow. This’ll screw up your product for later use. “Lately, I’ve been wetting the brush with the Glossier Soothing Face Mist, but Evian Mineral Water Spray is good for sensitive eyes,” Vincent says. If the top of your powder does get a little hardened by wet application, there’s a trick to remove it: Get a clean mascara spoolie and “exfoliate” your compact, Vincent recommends. This won’t crack the compact and will make it ready to go once more.

Photographed by Tom Newton.

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