Eight Ideas That Changed Fashion

Over the years, seasons, and collections, trends have come and gone. Some pass us quickly never to return while others stick around a little while longer and continue to evolve with us. This article looks at some of the most influential ideas in creating the fashions that we know and love today.

The Skirt Suit

An early precursor to the trouser suit of the 1960’s, the skirt suit was made iconic by the help of avid feminists, parading around the streets of London and Paris, exposing their legs to make a statement and reject the tradition of ankle- long swinging dresses. Thanks to Thierry Mugler and Claude Montanna during the 1980’s, the skirt suit quickly became the daily attire of the powerful working-woman.

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The Bra

Originated in the 18th Century, Mary Phelps Jacob’s was the first inventor of the bra that we know today. Her design consisted of two handkerchiefs held together by ribbon and was known as the ‘bust supporter’. However, it was the thanks to the help of lingerie brands ‘Agent Provocateur’ and ‘Wonderbra’ that put the sexiness into smalls, especially with ‘Wonderbra’s’ raunchy ‘Hello Boys’ campaign featuring Eva Herzigova.

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Vogue Magazine

Every girl’s favourite time of the month is when the latest edition of ‘Vogue’ gets posted through the letterbox. It’s the little book of heaven that gives us free makeup samples, serious fashion envy and killer outfit inspiration. It’s hard to think what women did during the time before ‘Vogue’. The power of this magazine is ever-increasing, with its aspirational cover girls and the overwhelming influence to make or break a trend, fashion wouldn’t be where it is today without the help of this gem.

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Trousers For Women

As popular as they are now, they were only deemed sensible for females to wear from the 1920s. It was the influence of bicycle enthusiasts, combined with the revolutionary ‘Swinging Sixties’ that introduced women to the practicality and comfort of more masculine silhouettes. It’s thanks to ‘Yves Saint Laurent’s’ ‘Le Smoking’ design that female trousers are now a go-to staple piece to every woman’s wardrobe.

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Military Clothing

After World War One, fashion naturally adopted the typical features of military attire. Cargo pants and bomber jackets became decorated with patch pockets, braiding and frogging. Camouflage print became less of a safety feature and more of a fashion statement and ‘Thomas Mulberry’ released a civilian version of the raincoats worn by British Army Officers. The Military influence still seems to haunt catwalks to this day, and is only getting more popular.

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The Little Black Dress

The little black dress is one of the rare fashion trends that has never departed from our wardrobes. The style and shape remains the same, sleek, elegant and never below the knee, although the neck line and sleeves change with the times. Ever since ‘Chanel’s’ LBD graced the cover of ‘American Vogue’ in 1962, the iconic dress has been a saviour to all.

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The Black Leather Jacket

Born from the movement of punks and bikers, the leather jacket is traditionally known for its rebellious reputation. Although Yves Saint Laurent dared to put a black leather jacket on his 1960 Catwalk, it is solely thanks to mods and rockers that this trend took off so rapidly and never disappeared. The staple piece became extremely fashionable combined with ‘Dr Martens’ and ‘Levi Jeans’ as a part of casual street style in the 1960s.

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Hot Pants

Normally associated with Cabaret and prostitutes, the hot pants could have been a hit or miss fashion trend. However, with their strong appearance in ‘The Blue Angel’ in 1930 and prominent mention in legend James Brown’s album of 1971, the hot pants caught on and continue to hug the curves of young women to this day.

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Words: Megan Goodey

 

 

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